Book Now

Hero 7

Our Service

At Molecheck skin doctors with specific training in skin cancer use a new technology called dermoscopy to detect melanoma and other skin cancers. This is the most accurate, thorough and comprehensive skin cancer and melanoma check available.

What Happens at an Examination

What Happens

What Happens at an Examination

Assess

Careful assessment of the appearance and the surface of the mole or lesion.

Diagnose & Treat

Skillful use of advanced dermoscopy technology to diagnose (our equipment allows us to diagnose cancers not identifiable to the naked eye) and treat lesions. Where treatment at the time of your consultation is not possible, arrangements will be made for surgical removal at Molecheck at a later date. Where appropriate, we will also refer you to a plastic surgeon or back to your own GP.

Our Prices

Full Examination

$265
$130

A full Molecheck examination includes a full-body assessment, and if required, immediate treatment of any precancerous lesions.

Adult
Child (13 years or younger)

Full Examination

A full Molecheck examination includes a full-body assessment, and if required, immediate treatment of any precancerous lesions.

$265
$130
Adult
Child (13 years or younger)

Family Concession

$210

Make appointments for 3 or more family members and receive a per person discount. Ensure peace of mind for all members of your family.

Per Person

Family Concession

Make appointments for 3 or more family members and receive a per person discount. Ensure peace of mind for all members of your family.

$210
Per Person

Short Check

$130

Assessment of 1-3 moles

Per Person

Short Check

Assessment of 1-3 moles

$130
Per Person

Corporate Concession

$210

Full body treatment for people under a corporate agreement

Per Person

Corporate Concession

Full body treatment for people under a corporate agreement

$210
Per Person
Hero 10

FAQ's

Why get a Molecheck?

To detect skin cancer as early as possible! The sooner skin cancers are detected the simpler the treatment and the more successful it is likely to be. When you come to Molecheck you are seen by a highly-skilled skin cancer doctor trained to accurately diagnose and manage skin cancers, even when they're not visible to the naked eye or as part of a standard scan. We pride ourselves on our ability to provide on the spot diagnosis to patients, which means early detection and no anxious wait for results.

Who is at greatest risk of getting skin cancer?

New Zealand has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world, with two in three New Zealanders developing a skin cancer over their lifetime. The most likely to get skin cancer are typically fair skinned people who spend a lot of time outdoors (for instance for work or sport), have a family history of skin cancer or have had any episodes of bad sunburn as a child.

How often should I check my skin, and what should I look for?

At least every 3 months you should examine your own skin to look for the early signs of skin cancer. If you notice a spot is new, looks different, is changing, sore, bleeding or itchy, come and see us at Molecheck.

Is a Molecheck covered by health insurance?

Insurance cover is provided by many insurers for skin procedures (cryotherapy or lesion removal) as performed by our Molecheck doctors. Entitlement and the amount covered would be in accordance with your policy.

What’s my risk?

The Scan Your Skin website has created this handy tool to help you understand your risk of developing skin cancer.

What about privacy and embarrassment issues?

We have both female and male Molecheck doctors available. A Molecheck skin cancer examination does not normally include an examination of the scalp, breast, buttock or genital areas. Patients should check these areas before undergoing the Molecheck examination and advise the Molecheck doctor to check any moles in these areas. A chaperone is available for the Molecheck examination, upon request.

What is a mole-map?

The term ‘mole-map’ is used in many different ways. Some doctors use the term ‘mole map’ to mean a dermoscopic check of moles to detect skin cancer, as undertaken at Molecheck. A mole-map means to others, a permanent dermoscopic scan of a mole. And to others, a mole map means a permanent record of all moles on the body.Simply relying on scanning technology to detect moles can compress these tiny blood vessels under the skin surface, making them invisible and therefore reducing the accuracy of diagnosis.

When is mole-mapping used?

All Molecheck examinations are conducted initially using a hand-held, surface microscope (dermoscope). However occasionally these assessments will also require a dermoscopic scan (commonly known as a mole-map) to be taken of individual moles. These permanent images are used when subsequent comparison is needed and to ensure that you are not subjected to unnecessary surgery. An initial examination using a dermoscope removes the need to generate a mole-map of the entire body and increases the likelihood of early detection.

What should I wear to my Molecheck skin cancer examination?

Female patients should wear separate top and bottom clothing. Patients should avoid wearing make-up, moisturiser and nail-polish.

Is any treatment given during the Molecheck examination?

Areas which have the potential to become skin cancers later (pre-cancerous keratoses), can be treated with cryotherapy during the examination. Age-spots and sun-spots may be treated during the examination if requested and appropriate. If surgical excision is required, this is carried out at a subsequent appointment. A referrals is made to a plastic surgeon when appropriate.

Does the Molecheck examination hurt? What’s my risk?

There is no pain involved with the Molecheck examination itself. However, cryotherapy (used to treat pre-cancerous or benign unwanted lesions) can cause a very slight sting that does not bother most patients.

Is the Molecheck examination safe during pregnancy?

The Molecheck examination is totally safe during pregnancy.

How often should I have a Molecheck skin cancer examination?

The Molecheck doctor will advise you about this at the conclusion of your examination. Although the Molecheck examination is extremely thorough, a small number of lesions may become apparent in the time between examinations. It is therefore still very important to self- examine for changes in size, shape or colour of existing moles, or for any new mole or lesion. Any of these changes should be reported.

Does my GP receive a report on my Molecheck examination?

With your permission, a report will be sent to your general practitioner.

What do I need to do to prepare for my Molecheck examination?

To make it easier for our team please avoid wearing make-up, moisturiser and nail-polish to your Molecheck examination.

A Molecheck skin cancer examination does not normally include an examination of the breast, buttock, genital or non-bald scalp areas. Patients should check these areas before undergoing the Molecheck examination and ask the Molecheck doctor to check any moles located in these areas. A scalp check is best carried out with an assistant and by making multiple parts in wet hair.